LRNT 522


Copyright Unknown

Copyright Unknown


Posted By on Aug 21, 2019

Upon watching the video webcast of Melanie Wrobel’s presentation entitled, “A Guide to Copyright,” I learned a lot of things I just did not think about. Most of the important definitions and basic information on copyright was a real ‘eye-opener’ as they say. There were three that stood out to me right during the first ten minutes of the video cast. Did you know there is a UN ‘Berne Convention’ to which Canada is a signatory, along with most other countries? I sure did not. This convention helps to set out international guidelines and rules to copyright. One of the unique things I learned was the idea of the ‘Law of the Land.’ This term describes the fact that when using material that is copyrighted, when in Canada, one must use Canada’s Copyright Law (Wrobel, 2016, 03:40). It does not matter where the copyrighted material originated. Another unique insight was that “ideas themselves are not protected by copyright – its the unique expression of those ideas that is” (Wrobel, 2016, 04:48). I always had the assumption that it was the idea one could copyright and therefore another could not use said material. However, if expressed in a totally unique way, almost…making it one’s own idea, one can use the said material. Of course there is always nuances to rules and regulations, but this one was truly intriguing to find out. Lastly, I also assumed that a production of one’s ideas without a ‘C’ – copyright symbol meant there was no copyright law associated with said idea. This is false as Wrobel (2016) explains that “if [the idea or thing] bears no protected ‘c’ statement, it doesn’t necessarily mean its not copyright protected” (05:30). This means we cannot assume something is not copyright, in fact, one should seek guidance if it is unknown if they are possibly infringing on copyright laws. All three of these concepts I have learned most definitely apply to me seeking to obtain a Master’s Degree. I need to be able to be confident I am not breaking copyright laws within Canada and most importantly seek further clarification or help from an instructor or copyright expert when clarification is needed. A good lesson for all of us students.

Wrobel, M. (2016, June 13). A Guide to Copyright (video webcast). Retrived from: https://ultra-ca-prod-sms.bbcollab.cloud/media/stream?original_media_url=sms_73e7fdd4f37d43febde43e4472315f20&media_display_name=LRNT502

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Good Questions with Expert Answers

Good Questions with Expert Answers


Posted By on Aug 20, 2019

Questions Posed to George Veletsianos: Do you find that using snowball sampling allows for a varied enough sample group for the types of research you are doing? When is it more or less appropriate to implement this as a way of finding participants?

Snowball sampling, when used in a research context, can be defined as “identifying participants, than asking those individuals to help you recruit more participants” (Veletsianos, 2019, 00:08). This type of sampling used in research can be useful because often times it can be difficult to find specific individuals you want for your research, particularly if they have very detailed characteristics you require for your study sample. For instance, there may not be many of the particular individuals you want; therefore, by recruiting others you increase your chances of getting your required sample. Individuals within your sample can help lead you to others like them, with similar characteristics you require. Veletsianos (2019), suggests that the question of whether a sample is varied enough is the wrong one…one needs to focus on the criteria of sample required for the research to determine if snowball sampling is appropriate. Specifically, “variation is not as important as identifying the characteristics” (Veletsianos, 2019, 01:35). I think it is important to note that Veletsianos first and foremost analyzed the question posed to him as opposed to trying to answer the question right away. If there is one thing I have learned in this course, LRNT522, it is that the research question posed, or any question for that matter, is a critical foundation which helps to underpin one’s research. Researchers need to be able to create the right question within the right context, which then enables good research to be produced.

Reference:

Veletsianos, G. (Producer). (2019, August 16). Question response to research (audio podcast). Retrieved from https://www.dropbox.com/s/gobpunyo0dr7jvn/q2.mp3?dl=0

 

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