Organizational Change Management (OCM)

Image result for organizational change management

Change is the only constant reality of life and is observed not just in our personal life but also on the professional front. But do all of us know how to deal with change? No. Managing change and learning to adapt to it takes time, energy, efforts and training and this is the reason why several learned individuals around the globe have come up with properly structured and defined models to manage change.

Organizations and their leaders are also changing as a natural response to the shift in strategic importance, from effectively managing mass markets and tangible properties to innovation, knowledge management and human resources (Dess and Picken, 2000). Kouzes and Posner (1995) suggest that the five main leadership practices, or what they call the “exemplary leadership,” are: “modeling the way, inspiring a shared vision, challenging the process, enabling others to act, and encouraging the heart” (p. 13). 

Al-Haddad & Kotnour (2015), talks about framework of change process by highlighting change type, and is defined as the essential characteristics that describe the kind and form of change and the qualities that make change what it is. Change methods defined as the essential characteristics that describe the kind and form of change and the qualities that make change what it is and Change outcomes are the consequences of change on the organization. They are a starting point of the change management process.

There are numerous studies and opinions identified by Al-Haddad & Kotnour (2015), that can be overwhelming and applying a method that is contingent and incorporates proven successful approaches is a step in the right direction.

However, the probability of success varies from one organization to another as organizations undergoing change vary vastly in their structure, systems, strategies and human resources. Below are two real life case scenarios about OCM and the process of deployment and implementation.

Successful organizational change management (OCM) process for a local radio Station

The OCM example above deals with a change process inside a broadcasting radio environment. The success of this project can be alluded to small scale change.

Small scale change is easier to initiate and manage, and does not require the level of leadership needed in big scale change (Boga and Ensari, 2009Stock, 1993).

The main target audience were the field reporters to get better with their stories, which are meaningful to their listeners. The training and development department conferred with the departmental leadership, initiated a dialogue between the reporters, producers and the senior managers. The past challenges and

Organizational (unsuccessful) change management (OCM) process for a large health-insurance organization infrastructure

 

The above OCM case scenario talks about an infrastructure system change inside one of the largest health-care insurance companies. The objective was to correct the contact center for better reporting and analytics of the customer calls.

The senior leadership went ahead and spent $26M on a new device, (with 3-years licenses) and an unknown vendor. The problems occurred right from the inception, primarily for the following reasons.

  • Lack of communication from the senior leadership to the entire organization.
  • Work and decisions were made in silos and a lot of time was wasted on not proper strategy and metrics about the end results.
  • The ultimate cost was the employee low-morale, bright and experienced employees either left the organization or let go because of the pressure from the higher-ups.

The strategy used in this case was political with a faster rate of implementation with short-term impact without looking at the challenges holistically. Also, the autocratic style of leadership was not conducive to the large organization. This was the exact opposite of Bandura’s (1997) notion of collective efficacy, where change efficacy refers to organizational members’ shared beliefs in their collective capabilities to organize and execute the courses of action involved in change implementation. Communications is an essential component of any change management initiative. As such, it is an important aspect of all change management theories. For instance, Lukas et al.’s (2007), articulation of the importance of cultivating an impetus to transform necessitates communication between change leaders and change targets.

Organizations and their leaders are continuously changing as a response to the growing global business environment; however, the success rate of change initiatives is <30 percent. Organizational change takes place over a period of time, and to increase the probability of success, it is important to plan for change, and address the critical factors that lead to successful. Moreover, it is important to adopt a structured methodological process to achieve the desired outcome. 

In conclusion I would like to quote Biech and Weiner (2007), ‘determinants for change efforts states that two keys to success are important for all change efforts to take place.

1.You need to have a plan. The plan must translate the concepts into concrete steps so that employees can implement them.

2.You need to carry out the plan—all of it. Carrying out the plan requires getting everyone involved who has a stake in the change. So, you must plan the work and work the plan.

References

Al-Haddad, S., & Kotnour, T. (2015). Integrating the organizational change literature: a model for successful change. Journal of Organizational Change Management, 28(2), 234-262.

Antwi, M., & Kale, M. (2014). Change Management in Healthcare: Literature Review, (January), 1–35.

Bandura, A. (1997). Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control.  New York: W. H. Freeman. ISBN 978-0-7167-2850-4ISBN 0-7167-2850-8OCLC 36074515

Biech, E. (2007) Models for Change. In Thriving Through Change: A Leader’s Practical Guide to Change Mastery. Alexandria, VA: ASTD

Boga, I., & Ensari, N. (2009) The Role of Transformational Leadership and Organizational Change on Perceived Organizational Success, The Psychologist-Manager Journal, 12:4, 235-251, DOI: 10.1080/10887150903316248

Dess, G.G. and Picken, J.C. (2000), “Changing roles: leadership in the 21st century”, Organizational Dynamics, Vol. 28 No. 3, pp. 18-34.

Kouzes, J. M., & Posner, B. Z. (2011). Chapter 1: Leadership Is a Relationship. In Credibility: How Leaders Gain and Lose It, Why People Demand It (2nd Edition) [DX Reader Version]. Retrieved from Kotter: 8 Step Process. (n.d.) Retrieved from https://royalroads.skillport.com/skillportfe/assetSummaryPage.action?assetid=RW$            564:_ss_book:43184#summary/BOOKS/RW$564:_ss_book:43184

Lukas, C.V., et al., Transformational change in health care systems: an organizational model. Health care management review, 2007. 32(4): p. 309-320.

Mackenzie, L., M (2008). Managing in the digital environment: Leadership in the information age: A culture of continual change. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1002/bult.2007.BULT1720330404

Weiner, B.J. (2009) A theory of organizational readiness for change. Implementation Sci 4, 67. doi: https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-4-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

 

Al-Haddad, S., & Kotnour, T. (2015). Integrating the organizational change literature: a model for successful change. Journal of Organizational Change Management, 28(2), 234-262.

Antwi, M., & Kale, M. (2014). Change Management in Healthcare: Literature Review, (January), 1–35.

Bandura, A. (1997). Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control.  New York: W. H. Freeman. ISBN 978-0-7167-2850-4ISBN 0-7167-2850-8OCLC 36074515

Biech, E. (2007) Models for Change. In Thriving Through Change: A Leader’s Practical Guide to Change Mastery. Alexandria, VA: ASTD

Boga, I., & Ensari, N. (2009) The Role of Transformational Leadership and Organizational Change on Perceived Organizational Success, The Psychologist-Manager Journal, 12:4, 235-251, DOI: 10.1080/10887150903316248

Dess, G.G. and Picken, J.C. (2000), “Changing roles: leadership in the 21st century”, Organizational Dynamics, Vol. 28 No. 3, pp. 18-34.

Kouzes, J. M., & Posner, B. Z. (2011). Chapter 1: Leadership Is a Relationship. In Credibility: How Leaders Gain and Lose It, Why People Demand It (2nd Edition) [DX Reader Version]. Retrieved from Kotter: 8 Step Process. (n.d.) Retrieved from https://royalroads.skillport.com/skillportfe/assetSummaryPage.action?assetid=RW$            564:_ss_book:43184#summary/BOOKS/RW$564:_ss_book:43184

Lukas, C.V., et al., Transformational change in health care systems: an organizational model. Health care management review, 2007. 32(4): p. 309-320.

Mackenzie, L., M (2008). Managing in the digital environment: Leadership in the information age: A culture of continual change. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1002/bult.2007.BULT1720330404

Weiner, B.J. (2009) A theory of organizational readiness for change. Implementation Sci 4, 67. doi: https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-4-