Reflections of LRNT 526

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What Can I Say?….

“Tree Reflection” by @Doug88888 is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

The journey this last eight weeks of learning has taken me was both invigorating and exhausting. I was lucky enough to be a part of a perfectly eclectic team of individuals who needled each other just enough to bring about that great synergy of creative drive – so thanks Patrick, Shelley and Wendy!

Branching scenario technology was new to me. H5P was not. I had tinkered with it in past musings and found other applications for plugins to the LMS we use at my place of work. It was the discussions within my team meetings that really started to outline a path forward in terms of how I might use this technology in relation to my field of interest.

Youth in crisis. Trauma-informed practise is how I have been trained to work with my students. It is a lens through which to view an individual. That lens allows me to understand their past in order to help them move into their future. There are so many challenges to finding ways to reach youth who have chosen to learn online, due to high anxiety or depression. The tools we are using now (Teams, Zoom, Google Classroom, etc.) don’t seem to be working for these students.

Maybe branching scenarios – practicing being in a setting that is unfamiliar or uncomfortable, with various choices and outcomes, could help these anxious youth overcome past traumas? Maybe with enough coaching and practicing through skills training (like this), could bring online youth to a place where they would be willing to come into a school and practice working in a real group setting?

The way forward with my inquiry will be both exhausting and invigorating. What I will take away most from these last 8 weeks, is the reminder of the brilliant minds that I am so lucky to share this space with.

3 thoughts on “Reflections of LRNT 526”

  1. Sandra,
    We both have experienced that connecting with others is valuable for learning, so how can we convince our students of this magic? Anxiety and depression are nasty beasts because the natural reaction is to isolate oneself. In your blog post, you mention your students resort to online school and that the current tools aren’t working. I think the words I remember you using in the past might work here, “How about we look at the situation in a different way?” Maybe what these students need is a bridge between moving from the face-to-face classroom to the online world—a time to reflect, recharge, and discover the benefits of meaningful social interactions? I keep seeing so many journal articles that argue the key to healing is physical activity and mindfulness. I know that’s what I did… and it seemed to work.

  2. Sandra, I so appreciate the direction you’re going here and see an appropriate application to our anxious and depressed students. The branching scenario your group included in your presentation could easily be adapted to a student walking into the school. What is so amazing about this idea is that the scenario could include images of the actual school the student would attend to help prepare them for their first school visit and face-to-face interaction. As Wendy mentioned too, empowering our students and supporting their well-being is a valuable end goal and one which could be achieved through innovative thinking like this.

  3. Thank you Sandra and your team for showcasing this interesting education training tool. After running through your examples offline, I was astounded at how well this might work in teaching my class about Equity, Diversity and Inclusion this fall. I will be sure to give you all a shout-out if/when we can find a way to incorporate H5p into the course.

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