Assignment #2 – Facilitation Plan – Final

Team Members: Terra Aartsen, Owen Lloyd, Kathy Moore, Leigha Nevay, and Kerry Sharples.

Our team has put together the following facilitation plan which outlines the different technologies and activities we will be using during our week long learning module.

Learning Objective

Demonstrate the relevance and importance of questions when facilitating learning in both synchronous and asynchronous environments.

Reading

11 Ways to Facilitate Great Conversations. (2016, February 10). Retrieved September 16, 2020, from Coaching for Leaders website: https://coachingforleaders.com/facilitate-great-conversations/

Maxey, C., O’Connor, K., & O’Connor, K. (2013). Organic Facilitation. Fearless facilitation : The ultimate field guide to engaging (and involving!) your audience (pp. 19-32). ProQuest Ebook Central https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.ezproxy.royalroads.ca

Useful Questions for Dialogue Facilitation – Inclusive Teaching. (n.d.). Retrieved September 11, 2020, from https://sites.lsa.umich.edu/inclusive-teaching/inclusive-classrooms/useful-questions-for-dialogue-facilitation/

Learning Activity Description

There are various learning activities scheduled through both the synchronous and asynchronous learning experiences.

Our synchronous session will be conducted over Zoom. In this session, we demonstrate the importance of questions through use of breakout room and main room discussions. Within the Zoom technology, we will demonstrate and use the whiteboard technology to enhance the hold smaller group discussion and overall teaching presence. Each member of our group will act as hosts within each of the breakout rooms illustrating the usefulness of questions during a facilitation. save the picture from the breakout room and present it to the class

Our asynchronous session will be focused around an interactive video. Automated messages including guided questions will be sent to the learners in order to set an expectation for the learning activity experience. Pos video automated messages will also be sent in order to ensure reflection on the activity has occurred for each learner. These responses will be posted anonymously in the Moodle forums to foster continued discussion and learning.

Description of Synchronous Session

Using Zoom Technology we will facilitate smaller breakout room discussions, allowing for a more personal interaction space. Each team member will act as a facilitator in a breakout room demonstrating our topic and guiding the discussion through the use of questions. Once the time is up, all participants will be drawn back into the main room, where each group will present their whiteboard and discussion points. In the background the team will create a word collage summarizing each of the individual breakout room presentations and then post it in the Discussion Forum in Moodle. Our group has decided to record this session for those who could not participate on Zoom. This will allow for those individuals to still participate in the forum discussion in Moodle.

Description of Asynchronous Session

Through the use of an interactive video our group aims to provide some insight and guidance of our topic. Along with the video will be quiz type questions in order to measure retention and gain perspective on learners’ reflections. The video will be embedded into our Moodle shell and invite the learners to further participate in Moodle discussions forums. The quiz questions will be posted anonymously, thus respecting individuals’ privacy, but also ensuring each individual perspective was shared.

Date and Time of Synchronous Session

Week 7: Wednesday Oct 7th 5:30 – 6:30 pm (PST)

Technologies

There are several technologies we will use during our facilitation week:

  • Moodle and various Moodle plugins
  • Crossword
  • Zoom
  • H5P interactive video

Timeline

We will begin with a welcome announcement message sent through Moodle. This message will provide an outline of the required activities along with a suggested timeline. There will be one set synchronous session held through Zoom on Wednesday October 7th. Learners are encouraged to take part in the various discussion forums.

Presence Planning

  • Teaching Presence

    • Through the use of prompting questions and guiding room discussions, we can create a positive and engaging learning environment.
  • Social Presence

    • Through the synchronous session, learners will be split into smaller breakout rooms each with a facilitator. These breakout rooms will allow for the development of interpersonal skills through smaller session sharing between learners. This environment provides an opportunity for learners to feel well heard and allow for a projection of their individual personalities (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000). The facilitator can ensure that each learner receives the opportunity to participate in a safe and respectful environment.
  • Cognitive Presence

    • Each activity, whether synchronous or asynchronous, will have a follow-up discussion or prompt in order to confirm that a reflection on the learning has taken place. By providing the opportunity for learners to summarize, discuss, and be engaged in a summary style fashion, learners are likely to feel a sense of sustained discourse (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000). We will be monitoring and engaging the learners through the discussion forums and throughout the activities. Our team has also provided a collaboration room for use if desired to further discussions and foster continued engagement.

Through the use of our chosen technologies and various learning activities, our group will demonstrate the importance of questions in a facilitation; thus, resulting in a reinforced educational experience. We look forward to our facilitation with you in Week 7.

 

References:

Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2000). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher educationmodelThe Internet and Higher Education, 2(2-3), 87-105.

Assignment 2 – Facilitation Plan – Draft

Our team has put together the following facilitation plan which outlines the different technologies and activities we will be using during our week long learning module. 

Learning Objective

Demonstrate the relevance and importance of questions when facilitating learning in both synchronous and asynchronous environments. 

Reading

We are finalizing our decision regarding the reading for this week. Please stay tuned for our selection.

Learning Activity Description

There are various learning activities scheduled through both the synchronous and asynchronous learning experiences.

Our synchronous session will be conducted over Zoom. In this session, we demonstrate the importance of questions through use of breakout room and main room discussions. Within the Zoom technology, we will demonstrate and use the whiteboard technology to enhance the hold smaller group discussion and overall teaching presence. Each member of our group will act as hosts within each of the breakrooms illustrating the usefulness of questions during a facilitation. save the picture from the breakout room and present it to the class

Our asynchronous session will be focused around an interactive video. Automated messages including guided questions will be sent to the learners in order to set an expectation for the learning activity experience. Pos video automated messages will also be sent in order to ensure reflection on the activity has occurred for each learner. These responses will be posted anonymously in the Moodle forums to foster continued discussion and learning.

Description of Synchronous Session

Using Zoom Technology we will facilitate smaller breakout room discussions, allowing for a more personal interaction space. Each team member will act as a facilitator in a breakout room demonstrating our topic and guiding the discussion through the use of questions. Once the time is up, all participants will be drawn back into the main room, where each group will present their whiteboard and discussion points. In the background the team will create a word collage summarizing each of the individual breakout room presentations and then post it in the Discussion Forum in Moodle. Our group has decided to record this session for those who could not participate on Zoom. This will allow for those individuals to still participate in the forum discussion in Moodle.

Description of Asynchronous Session

Through the use of an interactive video our group aims to provide some insight and guidance of our topic. Along with the video will be quiz type questions in order to measure retention and gain perspective on learners’ reflections. The video will be embedded into our Moodle shell and invite the learners to further participate in Moodle discussions forums. The quiz questions will be posted anonymously, thus respecting individuals’ privacy, but also ensuring each individual perspective was shared.

Date and Time of Synchronous Session 

Week 7: Wednesday Oct 7th 5:30 – 6:30 pm (PST)

Technologies

There are several technologies we will use during our facilitation week:

  • Moodle and various Moodle plugins
  • Zoom
  • H5P interactive video

Timeline

We will begin with a welcome announcement message sent through Moodle. This message will provide an outline of the required activities along with a suggested timeline. There will be one set synchronous session held through Zoom on Wednesday October 7th. Learners are encouraged to take part in the various discussion forums.

Presence Planning

  • Teaching Presence

    • Through the use of prompting questions and guiding room discussions, we can create a positive and engaging learning environment. 
  • Social Presence

    • Through the synchronous session, learners will be split into smaller breakout rooms each with a facilitator. These breakout rooms will allow for the development of interpersonal skills through smaller session sharing between learners. This environment provides an opportunity for learners to feel well heard and allow for a projection of their individual personalities (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000). The facilitator can ensure that each learner receives the opportunity to participate in a safe and respectful environment. 
  • Cognitive Presence

    • Each activity, whether synchronous or asynchronous, will have a follow-up discussion or prompt in order to confirm that a reflection on the learning has taken place. By providing the opportunity for learners to summarize, discuss, and be engaged in a summary style fashion, learners are likely to feel a sense of sustained discourse (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000). We will be monitoring and engaging the learners through the discussion forums and throughout the activities. Our team has also provided a collaboration room for use if desired to further discussions and foster continued engagement. 

Through the use of our chosen technologies and various learning activities, our group will demonstrate the importance of questions in a facilitation; thus, resulting in a reinforced educational experience. We look forward to our facilitation with you in Week 7.

 

References:

Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2000). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher educationmodelThe Internet and Higher Education, 2(2-3), 87-105.

The Online Sponge

As a new University educator I feel like a bit of a “sponge”, which in all honesty, isn’t a new feeling for me. I have been continuing my post-secondary education for the past 12 out of 14 years, trying to be a sponge for all of them. I feel like there is this concept of trying to absorb everything I can. I think of my students this way as well and my job, as an educator, is to create the opportunity for them to absorb my materials.

I teach accounting courses and have been teaching students in both face-to-face and online delivery modes. Most instructors shy away from teaching online as they find it to be quite difficult and disconnected from their students, but I really enjoy it and have received quite positive feedback.

I have used the Community of Inquiry, or “CoI”, model and created an infographic in order to provide faculty with support material on how to provide an effective online course. The CoI model is a way to provide a worthwhile educational experience, through the integration of three essential elements; social presence, cognitive presence, and teaching presence (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000, p.88).

The social presence element is based on building a strong environment for learners to feel welcomed, reached, heard, and a part of something. Bull refers to these roles as being a “social butterfly” and “a good party host” (Bull, 2013). I think that this is very accurate. In order to provide instruction and facilitate an online course, you need to be able to reach, entertain, and engage your learners.

Cognitive presence is providing the opportunity for the learners to absorb material. This is done through the understanding and retaining of new information. The strategy of controlling how and what information is being provided to learners is referred to as the “valve control” (Bill, 2013). Here is where instructors can focus learners attention to specific outcomes.

Teaching presence is the ability “…to design and integrate the cognitive and social elements for educational purposes” (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000, p.92). This element considers the design, facilitation, and support provided to learners. When looking at Bull’s Eight Roles of an Effective Teacher, I look at the remaining roles; “Tour Guide”, “Cheerleader”, “Learning Coach”, “Mirror” and “Co-Learner”, and see that they all relate to the presence and capability of the instructor (Bull, 2013).

These CoI elements and integrated strategies can provide the right type of environment for a successful online sponge experience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References:

Bull, B. (2013). Eight Roles of an Effective Online Teacher. Faculty Focus.

Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2000). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education model. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2-3), 87-105.

The Rabbit Hole Continues

Down the rabbit hole - Chicago Tribune

Each time we get to this stage in a course and are asked to reflect on our learnings, I think of my rabbit hole. This comic that I chose, so clearly defines how I feel. Each course teaches me something new, brings something different out of me and works to make me better. We aren’t at the end yet, but I can feel that sense of growth along the way.

This course has come at a tough time for me. COVID has hit me pretty hard and made work incredibly demanding. That being said, this course has surprised me. I didn’t think I would enjoy creating a DLR as much as I have. My background, before becoming an accountant, was Marketing. I was a Territory Sales Rep and Creative Director for a few years. Having started the Creative Design Department in Canada for my prior company, I was very used to being creative. This course sparked that creative side in me. In my Assignment #1, I pushed myself to learn and use a different technology within an old technology that I love. I used a software called Presenter Media, which is an animated form of powerpoint. I had a lot of fun creating that assignment.

Feedback has always been really important to me. I feel like I can’t grow and develop without it. However, it’s not just any feedback, but specific and focused feedback. I have really appreciated the feedback I have received in this course. It has reignited my excitement, as I feel like I can really push myself to do more, learn more, and ultimately, grow. “There is no failure. Only feedback.” (Allen, n.d.).

For Assignment 3, I completed my Design Note and a video outline. I am looking forward to creating my final submission of this assignment and finalizing my DLR. I am hoping to bring my project to fruition and present it to the University for use within our programs.

Looking forward to my continuing fall; excited to see what I can learn along the way.

Thinking Back and Moving Forward

I always thought podcasts weren’t for me. I don’t have time to listen to someone ramble on about nothing. Yet, I’m that person that has to have noise when working or studying, or pretty much doing anything. Silence is not my friend. It was love at first episode. I was working as an auditor at the time and I would listen to music all day long. I needed to listen to something while I worked and music was all I knew. A colleague recommended I try Serial. As a horror movie fanatic, it didn’t take very much persuading. My first experience with podcasting occurred three years ago. I haven’t tried anything since, until we began this assignment just a few weeks ago.

I really enjoyed the experience and learning more about what podcasts have to offer. This technology provides such great opportunity for individuals to experience different topics of interest without a cost. Podcasts are free, easily accessible, and can be done while doing other tasks providing a freedom of time.

It turns out I have been creating video podcasts for my classes for months without even realizing it. I record my lectures for my students so they have access to the materials whenever they need it. I provide an asynchronous style of teaching for my online courses and since COVID, all of my face-to-face instruction courses have moved online as well.

Podcasting is still such a new innovation within the audio and audio/visual realm of technology. There has been a large shift in the desire for online education, both synchronously and asynchronously. Podcasting provides content with an ease of accessibility for students and is not limited to just instruction, but can also be used for providing feedback or review of assignments. Using a podcast in your teaching can encourage your students to engage with your classes, your material and ensure there is not any missed content (Gray, 2017).

 

References:

Gray, C. (2017, January 24). Podcasting in Education: What Are the Benefits? Retrieved from https://www.thepodcasthost.com/niche-case-study/podcasting-in-education/#:~:text=One of the greatest advantages,anywhere, with very little effort.

My Rabbit Hole

Down the research rabbit hole | Tracy Abell

(Abell, 2017)

Our group chose podcasts for the team learning event and delivery technology assignment.  I was excited about choosing this topic, as I have been an on and off fan of the technology for the past few years.  I have to admit, it was a coworker who recommended Serial, that got me hooked on listening to podcasts.  The concept of being able to do other things while listening to something isn’t foreign to me.  In fact, it’s how I spend majority of my day.  I am a multitasker through and through.  To me, podcasts were just like listening to music, but instead, I was listening to a story.  I didn’t really think of podcasts in terms of education, or furthering my knowledge on a subject.  I had classified podcasts as a source for entertainment.

It wasn’t until my group decided to use this technology for our project and through my research, I realized that podcasts offer so much more than just entertainment.  Fang wrote a terrific article that outlined why people listen to podcasts and I found it very enlightening.  From creative inspiration, to entertainment, to expanding ones knowledge on a multitude of subjects; podcasts can provide a convenient source of just about anything (Fang, 2019).  Podcasts offer opportunity to individuals to be efficient with time by providing on demand accessibility.  Through further exploration as to the impact of the podcast technology on education, I found it really interesting that there was such a positive response from students.  “Irrespective of the form of podcasting, student satisfaction is typically strong and students generally perceive podcasts to have enhanced their learning” (Chester et al., 2011, p. 236).

As I continued down my rabbit hole of research, I started to feel overwhelmed.  There is so much information out there regarding different topics and it became clear to me that I needed to answer the question of how to deal with the abundance within podcasts.  I have come up with a few questions that I would like to consider in my research and I am open to suggestions regarding how to deal with the abundance of podcasts:

  • What questions are relevant when looking at the abundance of technology?
  • What are you doing with the information?
  • How do you navigate through an abundant amount of resources?
  • What makes a source credible?

I would appreciate any insight or thought regarding my topic of abundance or podcasts, and how the two relate.

References:

Abell, T. (2017, December). Retrieved from https://tracyabell.com/2017/12/07/down-the-research-rabbit-hole/

Chester, A., Buntine, A., Hammond, K., & Atkinson, L. (2011). Podcasting in Education: Student Attitudes, Behaviour and Self-Efficacy. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 14(2), 236–247.

Fang, W. (2019, December 24). Why Do People Listen to Podcasts in 2020? Retrieved from https://www.listennotes.com/podcast-academy/why-do-people-listen-to-podcasts-in-2020-5/

Change: Leadership in Digital Environments – A Roadmap to Success

Leadership

Al-Haddad & Kotnour and Biech noted some common elements within leadership with change: identify problem, create resource availability, invitation, train, support and review. This conception of how to deal with change in leadership can be adapted for a change within digital learning environments. Sheninger notes the 7 Pillars to Success for implementing change within digital learning environments, and even these notions show common elements to the above mentioned theories.

We start the roadmap with the concept of identifying a need for change. “Proper planning and analysis help[s] identify the gap between where the organization is now and where it wants to be” (Al-Haddad and Kotnour, 2015, p. 243). This process is important and leads to creating the vision for change.

The vision for change requires a buy in from all employees in the organization. In order to create change and be effective leaders, everyone needs to see the same vision and creation of opportunity that can be implemented by change. The downside of vision, is the sense of loss. “People go through phases as they adjust to change and people perceive change as a loss – if only as the loss of what was” (Biech, 2007).

Communicating within the digital age is looked at as a hurdle. “Important information can be communicated through various free social media tools and simple implementation strategies in order to meet stakeholders in the digital age” (Sheninger, 2014). Sheninger’s theory on communication is applicable to education or learning environments as well. There are many social media tools, or learning platform tools, that allow students and instructors to communicate effectively ensuring that students and professor remain on the same learning/course path.

The evaluation of performance provides a roadmap for students to see what and how they are going to achieve their grade or result in the course. This metric provides a clear picture of what is required for students to achieve success, but also providing an opportunity for growth. Evaluation provides a sense of effectiveness, efficiency, quality, and productivity (Al-Haddad and Kotnour, 2015, p. 241). By setting objectives and metrics on how to measure those objectives, students can see where they went wrong and instructors can see where more communication may be needed, where a problem may exist, and/or how they can improve to ensure students are receiving the information they needed for success. “Evaluating the impact of the change is an important step of closure, but deciding what to do with what you learn is also important” (Biech, 2007).

Support is an element that is often forgotten or rendered unnecessary. Students require support to ensure comprehension, clarification, or verification of their thought. Providing students the opportunity to reach out for support and assistance through different digital mediums can allow students to feel more comfortable and heard. Biech speaks to reflecting and supporting the learning with reflection (Biech, 2007). Upon reflection, students can review to see where they feel their needs are not being met, providing upwards feedback. Top down feedback is provided through performance evaluation, through criticism and critique. Instructors can incorporate self-reflection, looking at how they can improve their leadership. Along with reflection, is support during the process of change. “Consistently seek out ways to improve existing programs, resources, and professional development through technology” (Sheninger, 2014). Through support, instructors can alter the course, creating a stronger learning environment along the roadmap of learning.

References:

Al-Haddad, S., & Kotnour, T. (2015). Integrating the organizational change literature: a model for successful changeJournal of Organizational Change Management28(2), 234-262.

Biech, E. (2007). Models for Change. In Thriving Through Change: A Leader’s Practical Guide to Change Mastery. Alexandria, VA: ASTD Press.  [Retrieved from Skillsoft e-book database]

Sheninger, E. (2014). Pillars of digital leadership. International Centre for Leadership in Education.

 

 

 

Managing Change

In reading the articles and publications that were provided within this unit, I see a lot if content and theory that makes sense. However, I don’t necessary agree that our current technological and societal ties are taken into account specifically. Then I think, do they need to be? Change is change and whether we are changing to use technological advancements or not, organizational readiness for change, is a large factor to consider (Weiner, 2009). I don’t agree that all concepts, tasks and so on need to be adapted because we have technology. What we need to look at is the original theory and adapt that process of integrating change due to the technology we are using. Kanter’s suggested skills for change leaders are just as relevant today as they were in 2000:

  1. “Tuning in to the environment.
  2. Challenging the prevailing organizational wisdom.
  3. Communicating a compelling aspiration.
  4. Building coalitions.
  5. Transferring ownership to a working team.
  6. Learning to preserve. (7) Making everyone a hero” (p. 34).

It isn’t about the theory that needs to be changed, if leaders use these skills and adapt these skills to what they are changing due to technology, I believe the leaders will still be successful.

Sheninger’s 7 Pillars of Digital Leadership can really be adapted to any type of service or business (Sheninger, 2019). The leadership style and qualities are not confined by technology, but how how to embrace technology into the process of leading.

My leadership style most commonly aligns with Khan and Sheninger. I believe in the process and theories they have outlined. The 7 pillars are attributes I strive to have as a leader (Sheninger, 2014). Khan’s two theories of adaptive leadership and transactional leadership, are a broader view of my leadership style (Khan, 2017). This view hasn’t changed since Unit 1.

Leadership doesn’t play just a role in managing change, it is the main role in managing change. A leadership style can influence how well others take change, are open to change, or execute the change. Leaders initiate a change based on the strategic objectives for the company (Al-Haddad and Kotnour, 2015, p. 234). Once the change has been initiated a process must be put in place that incorporates how to get to the strategic objectives. Setting goals and defining performance measures allows an organization to clearly define a desired outcome and evaluate the execution (Al-Haddad and Kotnour, 2015, p. 251).

When I think about being an online instructor, I think there are a few important aspects to ensure have been portrayed. Using an example from Sheninger, communication (Sheninger, 2014). Students don’t have that time in class to ask me questions as soon as they arise, they are delayed through email or s discussion forum post and then my delay in a response. It is imperative I work hard to stay on top of emails, discussions and questions in order to best help students move forward with their assignments and questions. Another example that is evident in being a university instructor is, evaluation. For a lot of students, my course is one of the first ones they have taken online at University. Setting an expectation on how they will be evaluated in an asynchronous learning environment, is imperative. Students need to understand what type of information they will receive and how to complete the course.

When it comes to leadership, these decade old theories and concepts remain relevant in today’s world. It’s the process of incorporating change and how to do that within today’s world where we are behind. Adapting to technological advancements and incorporating this into the process of change is where we as a whole struggle, whether we are leaders or users.

References:

Weiner, B. J. (2009). A theory of organizational readiness for changeImplementation Science4.

Sheninger, E. (2014). Pillars of digital leadership. International Centre for Leadership in Education.

Khan, N. (2017). Adaptive or Transactional Leadership in Current Higher Education: A Brief ComparisonThe International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning18(3).

Al-Haddad, S., & Kotnour, T. (2015). Integrating the organizational change literature: a model for successful changeJournal of Organizational Change Management28(2), 234-262.